Saturday, May 31, 2008

A solution

Thanks for all your most welcome suggestions in answer to my whining about, "what shall I do with this bargello border?"
I used chalk to find the center (lengthwise) of the border - that is my guideline (allow for binding). Then I used a plate (note tick marks on plate) to start an even winding vine, starting from the corner. Decided to go 3/5 or 2/3 up from one corner and about 1/3 from the same corner going the other way. I'll do the opposite corner the same way.

The first two vines looked like SNAKES, especially after reading about a snake at a blogger's home! Narrowing the vine solved the problem. I then used a plastic pressing bar, then blind-stitched the bias vine in place. IMHO, the leaves should be all the same size and shape, repeating, rhythm, etc., because the bargello was so repetitious, but it needed some curves to soften the strong pattern. My one leaf template was used right side up and up-side down, resulting in a bit of variety.

And then, not being one to leave well enough alone, a divided leaf came to mind, and then why stop with just two greens? It began to show promise! The best use of fabric and easiest method was to make a strata with many greens, and fuse the entire piece, then cut them out, all at one time, rather that fiddle with a few at a time. I'm using Steam-a-Seam Lite (I think there's a "2" in the brand name somewhere - very confusing!). It worked very well.
I eventually rounded the outer tips of the leaves, knowing a point would be difficult to machine stitch. I'm hoping to use a stitch that resembles rough edges -- we'll see what happens with that, but "practice first" is necessary.
More fiddling with color, placement, 1 leaf or two, what about the ends? etc.
The greens are just enough 'not matching' to please me. And I deliberately placed leaves into and over the inner border, to give it more depth.

If you have not messed with fusible applique, give it a try. (I must admit fusible scared and confused me for a long time.) Also, don't throw the fused scraps away - save them in a plastic bag - they are good for a long time, and you never know when you'll need just a bit.

BTW, this was my UFO that I had dragged out of a dusty corner -- a corner I cleaned out as we were expecting company. What's in YOUR corner?

20 comments:

Candace said...

I think I will quote Emeril. Concerning your bargello, "Bam, you kicked it up a notch." It looks really pretty.

Lindah said...

ooooooo, this is going to be niiiice! There is something about a viney border contrasting with a geometric patchwork...that just catches my breath.

Jodie said...

Looking Good!
Jodie

dot said...

This is really nice. Nothing is in my dusty corner but dust. My tops that need completed are under my longarm. I have two tops for quiling, one wall quilt, and one top that needs some sort of applique. I am not really an applique person so still stewing on what to do. Yours is wonderful.

Annie said...

Your vines are the perfect border for this quilt!!! I have never tried doing a border like this ........... I think I may try.....

Joyce said...

Your border looks fantastic. When my vines started to look like snakes, I put a snakes head on them. Lol. My dusty corner holds mostly dust. The UFOs are in a drawer.

The Calico Quilter said...

How about a few pink buds nestled among the leaves? That would be fabulous. (Easy for me to say - I'm not doing the applique!) This one's a winner. Great job!

Marilyn said...

I love it! The vine and leaves make it a very special finish.

Carol E. said...

Wow, that is going to be a gorgeous quilt when it's done. Can't wait to see what finally pleases you and you settle upon.

Purple Pam said...

Which corner, the cluttered one, or the other cluttered ones? There is no room for dust because there is too much stuff in all the corners.

Luscious vine border on your bargello quilt. I am anxious to see the finished product.

jovaliquilts said...

What a great border -- and thanks for all the little tips on cutting the fusible leaves.

I have a question about fusing -- if you machine blanket stitch around the edge of a fused on piece, is that enough to keep it from fraying when you wash it?

Not much in my dusty corners, but I know there's stuff that falls behind the shelves!

Marcie said...

I love your method of fusing the back of the strata! Looks like you will have plenty for lots of leaves. Very nice finish!

sMC said...

once again stunning. Jolts me into thinking I must do something with the wonky log cabin, need it to be bigger. Hope life is treating you well.

Sharon said...

I think your strata for the pieced leaves is nothing short of brilliant! And the fusing is a good way of speeding the process up some. I also love that the vines don't go completely around the quilt - I think that's more interesting. I really like the contrast of the structured piecing with the curvy vines and leaves. This is going to be stunning!

Morah said...

Looks good. You make me think I should send out a shout to everyone for my border problem....

meggie said...

I love those borders!! My kind of style!!

Exuberant Color said...

It's going to be another spectacular quilt. Now do you have more corners to clean out and find more UFO's?

Karen said...

Imagine finding that in a dusty corner. As exuberant color says, you might want to check any other corners :-). The border is so wonderful and so are your photos describing the process.

Nettie said...

Loving this border. Thanks for the inspiration.

Tracey @ozcountryquiltingmum said...

Hi Elaine, I just love the two tone leaves, what a fabulous idea, thanks, tracey