Monday, February 19, 2018

"Box Kites", WIP, and Boats on the Other Side of the Studio

I've been sloppering with envy over Bonnie Hunter's "Box Kite" quilt for a while, and finally got mine together!  Colors  are purple, green, turquoise, a few pinks and yellows.   All is stash.   Backgrounds are white, no beige or creams.  The design shows up as light strips diagonally across the quilt.  The diagonal pattern is not very apparent in these 2 photos, but I wanted to get something fresh on my blog - so here's a start!  I'm machine quilting on my DSM, my trusty Janome MC6500.  We are under a storm warning today, Presidents Day, and while bad weather doesn't seem to have actually happened, I planned time to make progress with the MQ'ing. 

Mine is 130 blocks - once again, larger than originally planned - I can't seem to stop at "nap size"!   It is finishing approx. 72" x 92".   Most of the fabrics are kinda sweet, clear, a lot of polka dots, and a few "cutsies".  The little stripe is one border.  This is an easy, 6 in. block.  If I had a design wall, I would have clustered like colors together but ... no design wall.



Other side of the studio:  

While I work on my quilts, DH works on his boats.  While it starts as a kit, he is building an entire boat, only on a smaller scale.  The wood is included, and instructions, but nothing is cut out, the instructions are frequently in several foreign languages with the expected problems of language errors, measurement conversions, pieces get broken under the stress of making straight wood curve, clamps won't stay clamped on curved surfaces.  We both use a small studio - he is in one corner and I am in the other corner.  He gets threads in his boats, I have sawdust in my quilt - we got over it. 

This morning at 3:45am one of those clamps went flying off, noisily clunking to the chair then the floor -- waking us in a panic - we were sure someone had broken into the house!    


Friday, February 02, 2018

Inedible "food"!


I am not too particular about what I cook, or eat, but I do prefer that my meals contain something called "FOOD".   DH is also not particular and he was just hungry for pizza so I tried something new.  

How can such a horrible product end up at the grocery store?  On a scale of 1-10, DH and I both gave it a minus.  The "rising crust" was odd tasting - I can't even compare it to a "crust" or "bread"  -- it was even strange feeling to the palette, there was NO taste to the crust, beyond overly salty, and the topping was uhhhh, -- I couldn't eat it at all - again so  comprised with salt and who knows what else.  DH scraped off the topping from the crust and tried a few bites, but stopped at the second bite.   My action was just the same as his - into the trash it went.    No, I didn't read the label, but it was not out of date.  It did smell good while cooking.  I returned to the grocery store and requested my money be returned.  It scares me that such awful product is considered to be "food" and people actually purchase it.  

We all need to speak up more loudly and return such awful "food" to the grocery store.   

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Label on Mom's GFG

I was asked to present a Quilt Trunk Show in December at a Christmas Tea given for all the churches.  What a lovely honor.  Here is just ONE of the quilts (until I remember how to do a Photobucket thing!)  That's me, talking.   I attached a lengthy label on this vintage quilt - below is what the label says. 


Mom’s Grandmothers Flower Garden Quilt

 Maker:  Alyce Adair Wyckoff Broberg Eick
Owner:  (daughter) Elaine Adair Broberg Bradford Moore, Alliance, Nebraska

Mom, age 21, made this quilt in 1936-37, while awaiting her first child, Kristin, my older sister.  My folks lived in Chicago at that time.  Mom loved color and gardens!  The lively fabrics were from homemade garments for nieces, aged 3 or 4, who lived nearby with Uncle Bert and Aunt Kate.

This quilt had remained folded and unused (“save it for good!”) on Mom’s wood shelves in a farm bathroom for 25-30 years, and when the quilt was finally inspected, we were shocked to learn the wood acids had eaten holes clear through the quilt.  The center fold lines across the quilt were GONE, including fabric in the rosettes and pathways.  Other places, while still intact, were weakened or shredded. The binding needed replacing and the quilt was very dirty. Then it came to me, “the quilter”, and it sat another 10 years, but NOT on a wood shelf.     

I didn’t know the “right” approach to repair this quilt – the general consensus was that “Hexagons were difficult!”  One day in 2014, I gathered courage, template plastic, hand sewing materials, repro fabrics, and started making hexagon rosettes.  After a few false starts, several poorly made templates, I realized, I LIKED this process and in one week, had the 5 rosettes needed.  I was addicted!!!

I remade entire or partial rosettes and hand appliqued them over the partially destroyed parts.  I did NOT remove the damaged parts, but left them in, and did not remove any of Mom’s hand quilting.  The new fabrics blended in very well!  For the back areas that were so damaged or gone along that fold line, I cut a strip of thin cotton batting and backing along the entire width, and quilted it all together from the front.  In places that were not damaged, I basted the front to the back with blind basting stitches.  I replaced the worn binding, and gently machine washed the quilt one time.  My purpose was to repair the quilt, not make it look like new. 

I still hear my Mom’s preaching -- “It’s never as hard as you think it is.”  I am the only quilter in my family – it was up to me to save it.

Elaine Moore
Alliance, NE
July 2016