Sunday, January 14, 2018

Label on Mom's GFG

I was asked to present a Quilt Trunk Show in December at a Christmas Tea given for all the churches.  What a lovely honor.  Here is just ONE of the quilts (until I remember how to do a Photobucket thing!)  That's me, talking.   I attached a lengthy label on this vintage quilt - below is what the label says. 


Mom’s Grandmothers Flower Garden Quilt

 Maker:  Alyce Adair Wyckoff Broberg Eick
Owner:  (daughter) Elaine Adair Broberg Bradford Moore, Alliance, Nebraska

Mom, age 21, made this quilt in 1936-37, while awaiting her first child, Kristin, my older sister.  My folks lived in Chicago at that time.  Mom loved color and gardens!  The lively fabrics were from homemade garments for nieces, aged 3 or 4, who lived nearby with Uncle Bert and Aunt Kate.

This quilt had remained folded and unused (“save it for good!”) on Mom’s wood shelves in a farm bathroom for 25-30 years, and when the quilt was finally inspected, we were shocked to learn the wood acids had eaten holes clear through the quilt.  The center fold lines across the quilt were GONE, including fabric in the rosettes and pathways.  Other places, while still intact, were weakened or shredded. The binding needed replacing and the quilt was very dirty. Then it came to me, “the quilter”, and it sat another 10 years, but NOT on a wood shelf.     

I didn’t know the “right” approach to repair this quilt – the general consensus was that “Hexagons were difficult!”  One day in 2014, I gathered courage, template plastic, hand sewing materials, repro fabrics, and started making hexagon rosettes.  After a few false starts, several poorly made templates, I realized, I LIKED this process and in one week, had the 5 rosettes needed.  I was addicted!!!

I remade entire or partial rosettes and hand appliqued them over the partially destroyed parts.  I did NOT remove the damaged parts, but left them in, and did not remove any of Mom’s hand quilting.  The new fabrics blended in very well!  For the back areas that were so damaged or gone along that fold line, I cut a strip of thin cotton batting and backing along the entire width, and quilted it all together from the front.  In places that were not damaged, I basted the front to the back with blind basting stitches.  I replaced the worn binding, and gently machine washed the quilt one time.  My purpose was to repair the quilt, not make it look like new. 

I still hear my Mom’s preaching -- “It’s never as hard as you think it is.”  I am the only quilter in my family – it was up to me to save it.

Elaine Moore
Alliance, NE
July 2016

 

Thursday, December 28, 2017

"Bugs and Boats", and more Boats and Toys

Where did the month go?  mmmm a trunk show and preparations  ... photos are still not loaded onto Photo Bucket thingy .... hope I remember how to do them.

This little Bargello quilt turned out very attractive -- I named it "Bugs and Boats", a Bonnie Hunter inspiration.  I had purchased a lot of that dark fabric a while ago, thinking the red splotches were  flowers - but when I got home, those red splotches turned out to be ladybugs.  Kinda hard to add bugs to any quilt except for a boy, so it's lasted a LONG time.  The light fabrics are "boaty" and boyishy, and kids playing.  Some of the other fabric was donated by Kathy, a quilty friend who passed away last year.  Many people benefited from her fabric gifts, and she remains with us in many ways.  8-)))

Backing is all from stash.   (Yes, it's laying out in the snow!)


New subject -- My husband is still making boats, always,  he works with wood, but this time he decided to try LEGO!  Wow, they offer an array of high-end, expensive models.  We both fought the thought that they are just for kids and he decided to try one. 

 The little "men" are just so cute - it's difficult not to smile at them - one even has a goatee!  This project has been filled with laughter and smiles!
Have we lost our minds?  LOLOL

More boats - called a Modified Landing Craft, inspired by a boating magazine.  The boat is scratch built, but the best parts are the little "toys" we added.   OH MY - we had fun picking out the most suitable vehicles.




Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Critter Comforts #2, DONE

QAYG, backing squares were all laid out perfectly perfect, but when I turned the project face up, then the string blocks looked really terrible and chaotic.  I decided the front side with many various strings needed to be more organized than the back, so ... Perhaps next time I won't try to use up so many various stash items on the back.  But I like it, and the fabrics are all attractive, just not well ordered.

 Uh oh -- no fabric on this corner - this calls for creative applique!
 Done - destined for Donation Quilt.  This looks a lot like Critter Comforts #1, completed a few months ago. 
 Closer view of back.
It's very flat and square - lawn is crooked!  I totally enjoyed this QAYG method and am looking forward to the next project.   

Friday, November 24, 2017

QAYG, "Creature Comforts #2" -- waaaaaay toooooo much fun!


This went together quickly and I even had a normal life between sewing times. 

Lesson# 4652:  Backing squares are a variety of suitable stash, all arranged so the BACK looked coordinated and attractive, but when I turned them over, the front was a MESS, waaaay too chaotic, sooooo, I had to rethink that plan, and concentrated on giving the front a bit of order - the back is - uhhhhh ... interesting.  I'll reveal it in a later post.  You can tell the maker (ME) was frugal and using what she had.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

"Critter Comforts #2", (another QAYG)

I still had more animal prints, more kids prints, more batting scraps, and more fabrics for backing squares so I'm making another QAYG, this time, a bit more girly, (more pinks).  Finished blocks (trimmed) are 8.5 in.  They are 6 x 8, a good size kids quilt.  Honestly, this has been pure fun!   It only me about 1-2 weeks.  I put one row together with sashing in less than one hour this morning.  I was VERY neat and precise, and the stitches on back fell neatly OFF the sashings, like I wanted.   If you've made this version of QAYG, you probably know what I'm talking about.  Keep your iron hot and ready. 

My method is from a YouTube video from Erica Selman who says hers was from Leah Day. 

Here is my stack of finished blocks - even tho the strings were fairly randomly sewn, I did arrange them with a little order, and always white down the diagonal center.  When preparing to sew, I pinned the each rows together, and pinned a number on upper left for the appropriate row.  Stay organized - there is a lot of flipping back and forth during construction and it is easy to get them out of order.  I also had my variety of backing squares carefully planned and orderly,  but then the front was too chaotic, so I gave up on the back symmetry and concentrated on the front looking good.  It will be a surprise when I turn it all over! 

Strips on front (white) are cut 1.5 in., folded/pressed in half, and back strips (pink) are  cut 1 inch.   
One row, done.  My garden gnome says it's looking good.   

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Visually Disturbing

Hmmmm - wonder why my vacuum quit? 

OK, to the shop, 60 miles there, 60 miles back and I had to leave it.  Great Vac & Sew repair shop, but no idea of damage we caused when we tried to thoroughly clean up this mess, but they kindly gave me a loaner while I wait to find out damage. 

I'm also waiting for the new electrical connection and new range "eye" -- guess I'm not making gravy for Thanksgiving. 

Guess I'll sew, and work on my second QAYG kids quilt.  8-)))

I am wishing all of you a blessed, warm, and safe Thanksgiving Day.