Monday, August 16, 2010

Graphing the border

I am pushing the limits with this version of Log Cabin. Wow - talk about busy! Some of my fabrics are Kaffe Fassett, which I've wanted to try, but I'm ending up with a very strong quilt. Not sure I like it but no matter what quilt I'm making, I tend not to like it until it's done so ... here's to "getting it done!"

Since the quilt center is so strong, I thought the border needed to be equally strong. I chose this Bargello-type design. This design is very effective when you want to use up your fabric used in the quilt, when you want the design to wrap around the quilt, when you want your corners to be kinda clever. Only one of the fabrics needs to be repeated -- all the rest CAN be softer left-overs. I chose the brown to be the "marker." My pattern remains constant in this case.

Get our your graph paper! You MUST start at one end - leave the corner block undone for now - and work towards the center. No matter what side you are working on, work from the edge of the quilt towards the center, and modify in the center.


While this looks complicated, it is NOT, but you MUST plan it on graph paper. The strip widths are sewn together in a strata, pressed every other way, then the edges are sewn together and you have a tube. Then they are cut apart (these are cut at 2 inches), then carefully unsewn one at a time, so the pattern is repeated the way it is designed. A few mistakes were made, but altogether, it's strong enough to stand next to the busy Kaffe Fassett fabric. I'll show the whole project when completed.

You might be able to see my Flower Pin marking the last strip made, and there is an arrow marking the center in my graph plan. It's easy to get mixed up, but again, the sewing is NOT difficult - it's so darned neat! Your design on one side of the corner block may be different on the other side of the corner block. Keep your graph paper in front of you. Now it's time for me to start at the other end of that border.

(Note to myself - Elaine Adair, you dorky non-mathematician quilter! You drew your graph plans to one inch, but your squares finish to 1.5 inches! I'm glad I realized it now instead of at 3:00 am! The 'idea' is still accurate -- my own calculations are not!)

10 comments:

Jeanne said...

It looks great! I always use graph paper to plan my border designs. Even with today's technology, I still like my paper and pencil.

Gypsy Quilter said...

I vote for a tutorial. You're so very clever and I'm very much looking forward to seeing the finished quilt!

LC said...

There's that dorky word again... tsk tsk. Okay, I feel dorky, or is it too late at night for me too? This one is toooo complicated so I will read it again tomorrow. Nice colors!

The Quilting Pirate said...

OO very nice and thank you for the tips!

gamawinkie said...

good job!

Meggie said...

For a 'dorky non mathematical' you seem to do remarkably well! Love it.

Anonymous said...

Love your border, and the colors in your quilt are so interesting!

Purple Pam said...

Cannot wait to see this one finished. I like your alphabet quilt, too.

Sharon said...

Well, join the dorky non-mathematician crowd! You're certainly not alone. And as for me, thank goodness for graph paper!

I think you're doing a bang-up job with this border. I know you'll get the kinks worked out, and wow us with the finished quilt - as usual!

Mary said...

I always seem to reach that point in a quilt where I'm doubting my design....usually I end up loving the final product so while I do make changes as I go, I've learned to trust myself and continue on.

I use EQ7... Redrawing and making small variations is easier than drafting on paper for me.